Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for December, 2007

After we tore out all the walls and cleaned out the hundreds of pounds of plaster, we decided to rip up the floor next. We started peaking under the layers of linoleum and plywood at the door to the dining room and saw what might be hardwood. The first layers of linoleum came up easy, it was just glued down around the edges. Underneath that was a layer of 1/4 inch plywood. That was a bit of another story but once I could get up one corner and had enough leverage, I could rip of larger sheets. The staples that secured the plywood ripped right through it and held on tightly to what was underneath.

 

The different layers of flooring

The different layers of flooring

Great. Then there was a layer of old linoleum tile ontop of what looked like really old jute backed linoleum and then felt paper.

 

Hardwood floors in the kitchen

Hardwood floors in the kitchen

But the layers of flooring weren’t the problem at all, it was the stables. They were holding onto the floor underneath for their life and weren’t coaxed out by a simple staple puller or plyers.

 

 

Staples

Staples

A. developed a technique of grabbing the top of the stable with plyers and then putting a prybar underneath to lift it out. That mostly worked but still many of them broke and some just wouldn’t come out, so we set them instead. There must have been close to 2000 staples and A. worked on them while I tried to remove the flooring in between the staples. I think it ended up taking us like 3 weeks or so of night time staple pulling to get them all out. A. of course saved them all, just as a reminder. Whoever put down that last layer of flooring must have just gotten a new stable gun and just loved it so much that he put in a stable about every 2-4 inches. Thanks dude. The felt paper stuck to the floor well and we gave up trying to get that off. We figured a sander would make quick work of that so why bother. At least it wasn’t sticky like the glue underneath all the pretty gray carpet.

Read Full Post »

Hammer, scraper and pry bar are very essential tools one should have if considering buying a fixer upper. These tools come in especially handy when removing plastic tile, plaster and wall paper. The plan was to take down all the plastic tile in the kitchen. Being aware that not all materials used in home construction through out time we totally safe to human health, I had the plastic tile tested for asbostos before we started ripping it down. This time we were safe. But before we could really start at the wall, the cabinets had to come out. Although these seemed to be somewhat original to the house, they were in too rough a shape to try to reuse them. One cabinet was chopped off to try to make room for the fridge, there were no lower cabinets beside the sink which seemed to be after thought and had probably replaced a cast iron farm sink. So out they came, along with some plaster because instead of being screwed into the wall through the cabinet’s back like cabinets today, they were toe nailed along the top edge. No back needed when you got a wall. And to our surprise, although we were warned, there was a little surprise on the top shelf. A little present from the previous home over.

P1020334

And another surprise under the sink of other previous home occupiers.

P1020340

The tile came off, pop pop pop, and because now the walls were covered with a yellow smelly mess of mastic, we just kept on going. There is a certain satisfaction when smashing away at something. Disposal of piles of plaster wasn’t easy because we did not get a container but heavy duty garbage bags and many weeks of loading up the trash bin finally got rid of all that. Now disposal of the lath was another effort but because of some friendly folks on craigslist we only landfilled maybe about half of it.

 

Kitchen walls covered in mastic

Kitchen walls covered in mastic

 

Plaster on ceiling is already gone

Plaster on ceiling is already gone

Read Full Post »